Learning about Martin Luther King, Jr.

February is Black History Month, and Martin Luther King, Jr. is a central part of those lessons. Additionally, the third Monday of January is a holiday named in his honor. Even though there was a lot of racial violence during his lifetime, Dr. King insisted that violence was not the way to achieve equality for black people, but that they should instead use their rights to assemble and peaceful protests to bring about the changes that were needed.

A Modern American Hero

Martin Luther King, Jr. earned a place in the history books by standing up for the rights of African Americans. He believed that no one should be discriminated against on the basis of the color of their skin. He saw how racial prejudice was harming the country and taught that peaceful protest was the best way for African Americans to attain a better life.

Understanding Civil Rights

Civil rights are the everyday rights of people and are the cornerstone of American freedom. When Martin Luther King, Jr. became famous, black people were treated unfairly in many ways, such as not being allowed to sit where they wanted on public buses or eat in the same restaurants as white people. Dr. King is famous for saying, “I have a dream,” and his dream was that everyone would someday be allowed to enjoy the same protections under the law.

Peace and Kindness for All Americans

Martin Luther King, Jr., a baptist pastor, wanted a revolution in civil rights, but he did not want people to fight. Instead, he believed that peaceful solutions were vital to our country. His form of revolution was to hold peaceful protests that pointed out how African Americans were being discriminated against and demanded that the government take steps which guaranteed the rights and freedoms of everyone equally. He did not want people to fight, but he knew that these changes were the only way to avoid a racial violence.

The Dream of Martin Luther King, Jr.

In his famous speech, delivered in August of 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. laid out his dream for the future. He said that he dreamed of African Americans rising above protests involving violence and crime. He said that “all men are created equal,” just as it had been written into the Declaration of Independence. He dreamed of a world where his children would not be treated unfairly based on the color of their skin. He dreamed of black people having the same rights as Caucasians, including the ability to vote, travel freely, use public services, and eat in the same establishments.

Even though he only spoke of peace, Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in April of 1968, by James Earl Ray, who was a confirmed racist. That action gave credence to the Civil Rights movement. In some ways, that 1963 speech led to the first African American President, Barack Obama, being elected 45 years later, in 2008.

Montessori education treats and teaches every student equally, regardless of the color of their skin.  At the Montessori School of Fremont, our teachers use the past to teach students about the present, using hands-on lessons and encouraging open discussions.  We invite you and your child to tour our school today and see the Montessori Method first hand.

History of the Montessori Method

The first Montessori school opened more than 100 years ago in 1907. The school introduced what was a new approach to education at that time. Today, Montessori schools are found on every populated continent, and the methods first used by Maria Montessori have become popular in public and private schools alike.

The Origins of Montessori Method

In 1896, Maria Montessori became one of the first women to become a doctor in Italy. Her focus was on psychiatric methods to help educate children with disabilities. Far from accepting that these children were unable to learn, she looked for alternative ways to reach their natural curiosity. She experimented with different methods which seemed to show more success, and in 1900, she was given a role as co-director of a training institute for teachers in the field of special education. She put many of her earlier observations into practice, and the program turned out to be a success.

The Children’s House

Maria Montessori’s flagship experiment, Casa dei Bambini, opened in an underprivileged Italian district in 1907. Children who were considered ill-behaved or even unteachable responded enthusiastically to puzzles, hands-on education, and real-world activities. Maria observed how the children responded to stimuli, teaching themselves by playing and performing enjoyable tasks. Instead of forcing the children to learn using unfamiliar materials, she designed a classroom that was child-centered and interesting. The Montessori Method was born, and soon achieved recognition throughout Italy. By 1910, Montessori education began to be accepted worldwide, and a new way to educate children had arrived.

Child Based Learning

The tenets of the Montessori method were revolutionary and based on the idea that children learn better in their own environment and at their own pace. The Montessori classroom was designed around children rather than the adults and teaching materials included enjoyable activities. She believed that children are learning even when they are playing, and her classrooms were developed to encourage children to get involved and entertained as they learn. Instead of forcing children to learn in an academic situation, she fostered participation by making the learning process more enjoyable, using play and real-world activity rather than focusing on textbooks and rote memorization.

Child, Environment, and Guide

Teachers in a Montessori school are typically referred to as guides. Their primary purpose is to create an environment which children can identify with and respond to in a positive manner. The guides maintain a sense of order while allowing children to move about the different activity centers freely. To help foster learning, multi-age classrooms allow younger children to learn from older ones, which has the added benefit of creating a sense of worth and responsibility in children as they grow.

The Montessori method is a different approach to education, but one that has been shown to work, not just over the last century, but throughout the history of mankind. Children have always learned by observing and doing, and Maria Montessori developed a way to bring those traits into the classroom.

Montessori Children’s Center in Fremont, CA offers Montessori programs for children ages 3 months to 6 years.  Our teachers and staff follow the methodology first established by Maria Montessori herself more than 100 years ago.  Contact us today to schedule a tour and see the impact of child-centered teaching.

Teaching your child about December Holidays

December Holidays Present Wonderful Teaching Opportunities for Your Child

The Montessori method focuses on your child’s needs and allows for him or her to explore their world and the environment around them. December is an important month where opportunities to share with those in their world are approached. Children in this school setting receive the wonderful gift of time all year long, and in December, this time is used to embrace the celebrations of sharing, caring, and giving practiced by various cultures throughout their world.

December Holidays

December is the perfect month for learning about new cultures. This month is often focused on remembering others, fulfilling wishes, and celebrating. Children can learn about various cultural observances throughout December and come to appreciate there are people of all religions and cultures who come together in worship to rejoice and to feast with those they love. There are the well-known holidays such as Hanukkah, Christmas, and New Years and also lesser known holidays such as Bodhi Day, Dongzhi, and Yalda. Each celebration is important to those who recognize it, and your child will enjoy the experience of learning new traditions.

Well-Known Holidays

Hanukkah is the Jewish holiday, celebrating their devotion to the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. There are activities, books and the creating of the traditional Menorah to explain to your child the importance of this celebration and help them understand the meaning behind lighting the Menorah and what it represents.

Christmas is perhaps the most notable celebration, but it also has different traditions for various cultures. In the Philippines, their celebration of Christmas goes through all the ‘ber’ months – October, November, and December. With colorful lights and Christmas music, the entire country prepares for the much awaited season in a different version of the one celebrated in the United States.

New Year’s Eve is also a common celebration which many of your friends and family partake in festivities. Your child can learn more about this holiday through the New Year’s Eve Advent Celebration. They see how the Good Shepherd practiced and taught his faith and can even share a meal together where the kids serve each other.

Lesser-Known Holidays

Though we don’t hear about these holidays as often, it doesn’t mean they aren’t as important. Your child can learn about Bodhi Day, which is the Buddhist Holiday celebrating the day Buddha experienced enlighten. There is also the Donghzi Festival celebrated by the Chinese and other Asian cultures during the winter solstice around December 22nd. Another lesser-known holiday is the Yalda Festival, which Iranians celebrate on the longest and darkest night of the year. These are all important festivities, relevant to each culture and ones your child will enjoy hearing and learning. Learning about other cultures and respecting other’s customs will help your child grown into a more well-rounded adult.

The Montessori School of Fremont teaches it student about diversity and different cultural celebrations throughout the year.  Just as the Montessori Method believes, students learn to embrace and celebrate each other as unique individuals.  Contact us today if you would like your child to experience the gift of receiving an education that places their needs and interests first.

Preschool Center Ideas You Can Use at Home

Children are born with a natural curiosity to learn and explore their individual surroundings. Preschool-aged children thrive in a consistent, well-prepared environment. Promoting accepted behavior helps your child understand limits and consequences. Setting up your home environment to mimic your child’s preschool center will inspire growth and learning.

Ideas for Your Preschool Center for Home Use

The next time you visit your child’s preschool center, check out the different aspects of the room. Use the ones that best fit into your home environment.

  1. Child-Sized Environment

Creating areas specifically designed for your preschooler will help promote learning. Child-sized furniture allows your preschooler to engage in the environment without difficulty. Moving around the room without hindrance develops a sense of independence.

  • Low shelves for books, activities, clothing, shoes, etc
  • Child-sized table and chairs
  • Step stools to reach bathroom sink
  • Clothes hung at a lower level in the closet
  1. Promote Self Learning

Use baskets, small tubs, and trays to store activities and other learning materials. Your preschooler can set the item on the table for further exploration. After playing, placing the items back in the basket promotes responsibility. When making up the baskets, keep items together for specific areas of learning.

For example, a math activity could include placing small objects on corresponding color cards to match the number sequence. Preschoolers with advanced levels of learning could place small items on colored cards representing basic math.

A sensory activity should focus on one or two of your preschooler’s five senses. Simply providing your preschooler with measuring cups, scoops, and different colored beans provide a chance for optimal sensory engagement.

  1. Books

Place books on low shelves directly related to your child’s interest. Allowing your child to find books of interest helps in the learning process. When your preschooler shows interest in a subject in another curriculum area, books can be a foundation for continuous learning. As your preschooler develops other interests or curiosities, add different books.

  1. Incorporate Nature

Upon entering the preschool center, you may notice the emphasis on nature. Developing your preschooler’s understanding about the natural world promotes continuous learning opportunities. Provide your preschooler with items directly from nature.

  1. Creative Environment

Incorporate art into your preschooler’s home activities. Engaging in art promotes creativity with open-ended possibilities. Enhancing vital fine motor skills, art will strengthen finger and wrist muscles needed for learning to write and other activities in the future. Setting up a box of recycled or inexpensive items for art creation will encourage creativity, vocabulary, and language and physical skills.

Implementing small changes in your home will enhance your preschooler’s natural curiosity for exploration. Using the preschool center as a basic guideline will help you provide a consistent learning environment. If you have questions about setting up a home environment, contact the Montessori School of Flagstaff Westside Campus.  We invite current and prospective families to tour our school and visit our classrooms to see the Montessori Method in action.

Five Montessori Books to Read this Fall

Fall is always a good time to start putting a reading list together, especially when you have kids that are learning using the popular Montessori method. Books are a great way for kids to get prepared for autumn and help open the door to other learning experiences. You’ll want to read these books with your children this fall.

Winter is Coming by Tony Johnson

One of the most fun things about fall for younger kids is learning how fall relates to winter. In this cute tale, a little girl visits her favorite place in the woods where she observes the changing leaves, chipmunks and squirrels gathering nuts, and other signs of fall. As she observes these fall events, she notices the gradual change to winter, creating a good starting point to discuss seasonal changes with your child.

In November by Cynthia Rylant

There is so much that goes on in nature and our lives in November that this book makes a perfect way to open up discussion of all of these. The season is starting to shift from fall to winter a lot more quickly, and it’s easy to observe animals starting to prepare. Individuals are getting together to celebrate the blessings in their lives with loved ones. The beautiful illustrations in this book are a great way to highlight all these things.

A Leaf Can Be… by Laura Purdie Salas

Kids love seeing fall leaves, but one thing your child may not have thought a lot about is that leaves have a life cycle. This book uses beautiful illustrations to show how leaves change and evolve throughout the seasons. Your child will have a better appreciation for the colorful leaves depicted everywhere during fall.

Sophie’s Squash by Pat Zietlow Miller

A little girl named Sophie has an unusual best friend – Bernice, a squash. As it gets closer to winter, Sophie starts to notice some changes in her friend. Cute illustrations and a humorous take tell the tale of how both friends get through this time of transition.

Bear Has a Story to Tell by Philip C. Snead

A bear wants to tell a story before he hibernates for the winter. However, he quickly finds that his forest friends are busy making winter preparations of their own. The illustrations help follow the bear on his quest as he learns more about what his friends are doing.

These books are a great way to help your child learn more about fall. Colorful illustrations and fun stories help bring everything to life even for the youngest kids. They’ll be all ready for fall after reading these stories!  At Montessori Children’s Center, we encourage parents to read with their children at home.  Older students are also invited to join, as the Montessori method encourages students to work together.  To see what books our students are reading this fall, visit us today!

The Montessori Environment: What is your Role as an Adult?

In the classroom and at home, the adults in a child’s life play a vital role in education. The Montessori environment positions adults as a guide for children to draw upon for information, guidance, and resources that promote learning. Their role is not to force the child to conform to preconceived ideas, but to provide necessary materials and help the child discover methods or activities that nurture learning and development.

Practice, Consistency, and Motivation

The role of the adult can be summed up using the 3 key components of the adult-child relationship. Far from being an authoritarian role, it is more supportive than dictatorial. The components are simple ones:

  • Practice – Give the child ample opportunity to experiment with ideas and practice skills. Think of this as allowing children to review and reaffirm past lessons rather than rushing them from one milestone to the next.
  • Consistency – Establish and stick to a consistent plan. This does not mean that a rigorous schedule is necessary – it means that the there needs to be regularity in the learning environment.
  • Motivation – This is arguably the most important part of Montessori learning. Children who receive encouragement and support are more enthusiastic about learning and experiencing new things. Motivation builds self-confidence, and that promotes moving forward.

Planning and Support

For the child, a seamless environment is preferable to a chaotic one. Adults, whether they are parents or teachers, need to provide the planning necessary for smooth transitions throughout the day, week, and the years to come. This includes having the materials available for course studies, and providing the encouragement and support which merges one lesson or activity into the next. Give children the freedom to move from one activity to the next by making sure the choices are available to them when they are ready.

Preparation and Guidance

Many of the responsibilities of the adult take place behind the scenes. Planning and preparation are invisible guidelines in the classroom which allow smooth transitioning and freedom to move about the classroom. As a guide, your encouragement and participation are as important as the preparation. This includes discussing how the child is progressing, offering suggestions on how to solve problems, and maintaining a comfortable atmosphere.

Emotional and Intellectual Interaction

In order for a child to excel, they need to be comfortable, both emotionally and intellectually. It is more practical to help a child understand their feelings than to simply dictate why they should react a certain way. This helps put emotional reactions and intellectual understandings on par and gives the child a framework to build on. An adult is needed to help the child understand their feelings and pursue their understandings rather than dictating how one should behave and what they must learn.

Montessori education recognizes that adults play a key role in a child’s education.  At the Montessori School of Flagstaff Westside Campus, our teachers work with parents and guardians, assisting them with the continuation of Montessori learning outside of school.  If you are looking for more ways to get involved with your child’s education, contact us today to learn ways to play an active role in your child’s daily learning.